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Stacked: A 32DDD, Seligson’s Booby Trap

Stacked: A 32DDD, Seligson’s Booby Trap

What is it about breasts–or if, you prefer, bazoombas, melons, Dolly Partons, or breastasauri–that inspires such fascination? No one is even sure why women have breasts when not pregnant or nursing, but start a conversation about them, Susan Seligson discovered, and every woman, man, child, and drag queen has something to say. In “Stacked,” this intrepid 32DDD writer takes us on a journey through a culture where breasts have come to stand for all that is woman. Seligson introduces us to the proud owners of the world’s largest augmented breasts; crusaders for the right to parade bare-chested in public; and women pining for larger breasts or smaller ones, who may resort to surgery or stranger fixes (breast-enhancing gum? giant suction cups?) to get the breasts of their dreams.

She relates the history of the bra and takes us on a quest for the perfect one. She explores the thinking of surgeons who do hundreds of breast implants a year, academics suspicious of our changing standards of femininity, and the editor of “Busty Beauties” magazine. And she writes throughout with the wisdom and humor of a woman who knows what it is to wield body parts so powerful they can make men crash cars. Susan Seligson is a journalist and the author of “Going with the Grain”; she has also coauthored four children’s books with her husband, cartoonist Howie Schneider. She has written for the “New York Times Magazine,” Salon.com, “Atlantic Monthly,” “Redbook,” the “Boston Globe Magazine,” “Outside,” and “Allure,” among others, and currently writes an award-winning humor column for the “Provincetown Banner.” She lives in North Truro, MA.

What is it about breasts that inspires such fascination? No one is even sure why women have breasts when not pregnant or nursing, but start a conversation about them, Susan Seligson discovered, and every woman, man, child, and drag queen has something to say. In “Stacked,” this intrepid 32DDD writer takes us on a journey through a culture where breasts have come to stand for all that is woman. Seligson introduces us to the proud owners of the world’s largest augmented breasts; crusaders for the right to parade bare-chested in public; and women pining for larger breasts or smaller ones, who may resort to surgery or stranger fixes to get the breasts of their dreams.

She relates the history of the bra and embarks on a quest for the perfect one. She explores the thinking of surgeons who do hundreds of breast implants a year, academics suspicious of our changing standards of femininity, and the editor of “Busty Beauties” magazine. And she writes throughout with the wisdom and humor of a woman who knows what it is to wield body parts so powerful they can make men crash cars. “A good-natured examination of the breast question . . . “Stacked “is on the side of right–a celebration, neither prudish or depraved, of ‘female orbs’ in all their hypnotic glory.”–Ada Calhoun, “New York Times Book Review”

“A petite woman naturally endowed with large breasts, humor writer Susan Seligson had only to look down to find the subject of her next book. Why, she wondered, do men and women fetishize the female anatomy? In “Stacked,” Seligson . . . has written an entertaining treatise on America’s breast obsession.”–“The Boston Globe”

“On location in L.A., Seligson] manages to be both sympathetic and funny in profiles of the creator of “Busty Beauties” and of plastic surgeon Robert Rey, cable TV’s Dr. 90210. Her pilgrimage to Las Vegas in search of 156MMM dancer Maxi Mounds has an entertaining “Waiting for Godot” quality, and it’s informative to boot: Who knew that polyprolene string was the implant material of choice for the ‘macro-boob sorority’.”–“The New York Observer”

“‘Everybody loves to talk about boobs’ . . . though few do so with the humor, poignancy, smarts and insight Seligson mixes artfully throughout chapters that examine the importance of the breast in our culture.”–“Springfield Republican”

“I always thought beautiful breasts were there just to behold and hold, but Susan Seligson set me straight. Breasts are there to write about. I don’t know how adolescents will take to “Stacked,” but we Golden Agers are here to take the turns on the trip she offers.”–Norman Mailer

“Like an artful comedienne, journalist Seligson, a self-avowedly well-endowed woman, wittily recounts her experiences as she anecdotally examines ‘what breasts mean to their bearers as well as their beholders.’ Assessing an abundant lexicon of breast slang, Seligson ponders the role of breasts as the marker of femininity, conversing with women of all ages about how their breast size affects their daily life and self-image. Quizzing experts on the evolutionary role of breasts for human sexual attraction, she surveys the history of the brassiere before purchasing ‘the perfect bra’ at a renowned Manhattan retailer. Seligson’s candid observations are hilarious as she visits a workaholic editor for “Busty Beauties” magazine and searches for the Guinness-record-holder for breast size, one Maxi Mounds, at an exotic dancing event.

Questioning the global phenomenon of breast augmentation, Seligson reveals industry scams and discusses the psychology, ethics and cultural implications of implant consumerism with leading plastic surgeons and media scholars. Concluding with cross-dressers and their removable breasts, the author proclaims herself at peace with herself as ‘a person who happens to be stacked.’ Seligson’s earthy merriment and compassionate humor triumph.”–“Publishers Weekly” (starred review) “Seligson . . . finds the humanity in just about all of her interview subjects.”–“Kirkus Reviews””” “As she makes clear in the title, journalist Seligson is a woman with size 32DDD breasts and a sense of humor. She sets out to discover whether life is really better for women with larger breasts. Seligson interviews women with various-sized breasts, women who have had breast augmentation or reduction, women with record sett (less)

 

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