Plus Size model, huge and huge tits

Plus Size model, huge and huge tits

Plus-size model is term applied to an individual of larger stature (sometimes but not exclusively overweight or obese) who is engaged primarily in modeling plus-size clothing. Plus-size models also engage in work that is not strictly related to selling large-sized clothing, e.g., stock photography and advertising photography for cosmetics, household and pharmaceutical products and sunglasses, footwear and watches Therefore plus-size models do not exclusively wear garments marketed as plus-size clothing. This is especially true when participating in fashion editorials for mainstream fashion magazines.

Synonymous and interchangeable with plus-size model is “full-figured model”,[1] “extended-sizes model”, and “outsize model”.[2] Previously, the term “large size model” was also frequently used

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Origins in North America

A page from the Lane Bryant Spring/Summer 1954 catalog.

Lane Bryant began trading in the early 1900s as a producer of clothing for “Expectant Mothers and Newborn”‘.[16] By the early 1920s, Lane Bryant started selling clothing under the category ‘For the Stout Women’, which ranged between a 38-56 inch bustline.[16] The earliest catalogs used illustrations to sell their products, but by the mid-1950s photographs were integrated into the catalogs as the evolution of printing technology made this option available. After a hiatus through the 1960–1980 period, Lane Bryant again began using plus-size models.

Although U.S.-based manufacturers used larger models to show their plus-size clothing as early as the 1940s, the bias against larger consumers and models pervasive in the fashion industry worked to keep this particular concept of modeling out of the general public’s eye until the late 1970’s.[citation needed]The U.S. Large Size Revolution actually began in the late 1970’s with Beth Kramer and Mary Duffy at Big Beauties, Plus Models, Other Dimensions and a small division at Ford Models. According to Duffy, it was thought to be a response to the end of the successful Junior Market supported by Baby Boomers who were growing up, as the Garment Center looked to expand new markets.

Specialty model agency divisions

Plus size models were first represented by model agencies in the 1970s. Prior to this, models freelanced directly with retailers, designers and magazines.[17] Former plus-size model Mary Duffy founded Big Beauties Little Women, the first agency specializing in plus-size and petite models in 1977.[18] Pat Swift, a plus-size model at the time, founded Plus Models in 1978.[17] Ford Models began representing plus size models in 1978, and added two models to their board, including top model Ann Harper, due to demand from clients.[3] By the late 1980s, Plus Models was the largest and most successful plus-size specialty agency, representing over 65 models and grossing over 2 million dollars in revenue.[17] By 1984, Big Beauties Little Women was successful enough to run national model searches advertised in the press.[19] The prize included the cover of It’s Me magazine, a nationally published magazine for plus-size women.[19] Not long after, Plus Models began holding national model searches. By the mid-1980s, top plus size models could earn as much as 150,000 to 200,000 dollars a year.[4] Ford Models bought Big Beauties Little Women in 1988, later renaming the division Special Sizes and then Ford 12+.[20][21]

Wilhelmina NYC agent Susan Georget started the Wilhelmina 10/20 division in New York in 1994, recently re-branded W Curve.[22][23] Gary Dakin headed New York’s Karin Models’ Curves division, only to leave after a short time to develop Ford Models’ Ford 12+(rebranded Ford+) model division in their New York office in 1998.[22][24] In Constantine Valhouli’s 2001 plus-size model documentary Curve, Dakin states, “We’re celebrating our 25th anniversary of the Ford 12+ division. It was the first and longest-existing plus division in the industry.”(sic) Together, these agents created agency divisions that have continued to recruit the highest caliber of models in the industry and are credited with expanding opportunities for plus-size models beyond working solely for plus-size clothing retailers.[22][23]

Former plus-size model Becca Thorpe founded the plus-size division at Muse Model Management, a boutique fashion agency in 2011.[25] Muse also recruits high caliber models and had advanced opportunities for plus-size models beyond advertising for plus-size retailers.

Ford Models closed its plus-size division in June 2013 to focus on its editorial divisions.[26] Gary Dakin and Jaclyn Sarka founded Jag Models in July 2013, which currently represents about 30 models sizes 8-18.[26] The agency does not brand its models as plus-size.[26][27][28]

There are a large number of reputable agencies throughout the U.S. and Canada, and internationally in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Turkey and the UK

 

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