Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons

Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons
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Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons
Watch AWesome MILF Cindy Crwaford is haivng interracial sex adventure. Sensational older brunette is enjoying wild sex with the amazing stranger wearing the mask of glory hole.

Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons

Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons
Watch AWesome MILF Cindy Crwaford is haivng interracial sex adventure. Sensational older brunette is enjoying wild sex with the amazing stranger wearing the mask of glory hole.

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Cindy Crawford: My Brand Is “MILF Next Door

Cindy Crawford MILF Lessons

When you sit across from Cindy Crawford, it’s sort of like sitting across from a hologram. The feeling is one of, Wait, I had this poster in my dorm room. Cool.

But she’s real, and that realness has always been her great power. Ever since the early nineties, when she emerged as one of the original supermodels (along with Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Linda Evangelista), Crawford has been building a career that has endured now for twenty-five years.

We met at Asiate in the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New York. She was dressed in tight jeans and a leather motorcycle-style jacket with zippers that gleamed. She appears to have barely aged. The hair is still that same Cindy mane; the lips are those lips.

She had just come from an interview with Howard Stern, and expressed her disappointment—at his good behavior. “I was all prepared for him to be filthy and ‘go there,’ but he was nice. It kind of threw me off.”

Maybe you have that effect on guys? I suggest. Make them better?

She laughs. “I don’t know. I like Howard. I was all ready…”

Crawford, like most models, is taller than you think. I’m six-three, and it feels like she’s just about my height—and all of her height seems to be in her legs. As I walk into the restaurant beside her, her hips come up to my abdomen. We find a table near the window, and the waiter asks if we want bread.

“Not this week,” Crawford says. “This week, bread is the devil. I have to get through this tour.” She’s promoting her new book, Becoming, a retrospective not merely of her glossy, iconic photographs over the past thirty years, but of her life and what she has learned.
The all-American model on her new book, learning from Cara Delevingne, and her wish for Howard Stern to be raunchier

When you sit across from Cindy Crawford, it’s sort of like sitting across from a hologram. The feeling is one of, Wait, I had this poster in my dorm room. Cool.

But she’s real, and that realness has always been her great power. Ever since the early nineties, when she emerged as one of the original supermodels (along with Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Linda Evangelista), Crawford has been building a career that has endured now for twenty-five years.

We met at Asiate in the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in New York. She was dressed in tight jeans and a leather motorcycle-style jacket with zippers that gleamed. She appears to have barely aged. The hair is still that same Cindy mane; the lips are those lips.

She had just come from an interview with Howard Stern, and expressed her disappointment—at his good behavior. “I was all prepared for him to be filthy and ‘go there,’ but he was nice. It kind of threw me off.”

Maybe you have that effect on guys? I suggest. Make them better?

She laughs. “I don’t know. I like Howard. I was all ready…”

Crawford, like most models, is taller than you think. I’m six-three, and it feels like she’s just about my height—and all of her height seems to be in her legs. As I walk into the restaurant beside her, her hips come up to my abdomen. We find a table near the window, and the waiter asks if we want bread.

“Not this week,” Crawford says. “This week, bread is the devil. I have to get through this tour.” She’s promoting her new book, Becoming, a retrospective not merely of her glossy, iconic photographs over the past thirty years, but of her life and what she has learned.
cindy-crawford-book-cover.jpg

Crawford, believe it or not, turns fifty next year. She’s married to Rande Gerber, the nightlife entrepreneur, and is a mother of two teenagers, a son and a daughter. She was born in DeKalb, Illinois, a farming town thirty miles west of Chicago. She still has a whiff of the accent in her speech, saying bar as bahhrrrr. Her father was a machinist and her mother worked in a doctor’s office. Her parents got married young (her mother was pregnant at sixteen), and when she was ten her baby brother died of leukemia. The family was middle-class Midwestern, and to make money she spent her summers working in the cornfields that surrounded the town (yes, guys, it is just as you picture it—she was wearing Daisy Dukes). Later she earned a full ride for academics to Northwestern University to study chemical engineering. She dropped out after her first semester, after she appeared in a bikini on the cover of the DeKalb Nite Weekly—a local newspaper—and her modeling career began to take off. She moved to New York, and the rest is Cindy, Inc.

Years before the idea of “branding” yourself and developing “platforms” to share that brand became the clichés they are today, Cindy Crawford was a major brand with multiple platforms. She not only was a founding member of the “supermodel” world; she was also the first model to use modeling to build a multi-prong business empire. She wasn’t just walking the runway and doing magazine covers; she also made it big in TV, hosting House of Style on MTV; she created a fitness video; she published a calendar that sold bazillions of copies.

What comes across in her new book is, in fact, how savvy she is. It might sound strange to say about a woman who started as “just” a model, but here it is: Crawford’s book has smart advice and valuable insights for anyone looking to make their way in a world where everyone is trying to stand out from the pack. One of my favorite moments: Crawford is in a business meeting, getting pitched an idea. Instead of thinking like so many men and trying to hit the ball out of the park, she asked the guys who were pitching her: “What does a single look like?”

“It’s a smart way to look at business,” she tells me. “I’ve always thought about business that way. And I don’t like to let someone down in business. So you need to know if you just get on base, is that a success? Will we all be happy with that? I like the analogy, because time is money for all of us. For every decision I make, it comes down to ‘How much time am I going to have to spend on this, and what am I going to get back?’ So I always think, Okay, what’s the single? And is this too much work for just a single? And then I still want to know what the home run is, because of course I still want that.”

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